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1 hour ago on August 20th | J | 209,177 notes
theroguefeminist:

elliedoh:

So when Miley Cyrus or Katy Perry bring black girls on stage, dance with them, acknowledge their figures- it’s offensive and appropriating. But, when Nicki Minaj makes an entire video focusing around black girl’s asses and asserts her power, reduces these women to objects and flaunts her authority it’s YAAASSSSS NICKI SERVE IT. Is that because she’s black? So it’s okay for people of the same race to dance with each other but someone who does not share the same levels of melanin enters the picture, they’re doing something wrong? …idgi 

You’re completely ignoring context. In Lily Allen’s Hard out Here video, she literally says, “I don’t shake my ass cause I have a brain” as Black women shake their asses in her video. She is literally degrading the Black women who shake their asses in the media. The song also uses references to Black rappers (i.e. the title of the song referencing the rap song “Hard out Here for a Pimp” and her lyric “bragging ‘bout my cars or talking ‘bout my chains”), suggesting that Black rappers are more sexist than white male musicians (which isn’t true, there’s lots of sexism in all music genres) and also suggest the source of sexism in the music industry is Black people (Black male rappers and twerking Black female dancers).
In contrast, Nicki Minaj is reclaiming a song (Baby Got Back) that was made by a Black male rapper who celebrated (but also objectified) Black female bodies. Throughout her song, Nicki raps like a man would, talking about her sexual conquests with men and the size of their dicks, almost as a way of doing to men what they have done to women (objectifying their dicks as Sir Mix A Lot objectified Black women’s asses and many other men objectify women’s vaginas). She also brags about her sexual prowess and stays in control and aggressive in the video (she goes as far as cutting a banana representing a dick and slapping Drake’s hand away—the video critiques the male gaze). The target of mockery and disparagement in Nicki’s video is men and the male gaze, and the video works to reclaim agency from it.
In what way is Nicki asserting power over her dancers? In her video, she twerks along side her back up dancers and dances with them and interacts with them on the same level. She is just as scantily clad as they are. Lily Allen, however, stays fully covered in her video, does not dance provocatively, and thus contrasts her own pure and respectable femininity with the Black women, using their twerking and scantily clad bodies as an example of “bad” female sexuality and femininity—of women “objectifying themselves.” This is racist because it frames Black female sexuality as lesser than white femininity and antithetical to feminism.
In summary: Nicki’s video is very much a celebration of female Black beauty and sexuality coming from a Black woman. Conversely, Lilly Allen’s is using Black women as props to frame them as a vile or bad form of sexuality or being too sexual to prop up her own feminism.
So you might say, “what about Miley Cyrus? she twerks along side her Black background dancers too!” But here’s the problem: Miley Cyrus continually appropriates Black culture and also uses Black women as props. It does matter that these artists are white because in these cases the point of including the Black women is either to, in Lily Allen’s case, offset Black sexuality/femininity as too sexual or bad in comparison with her white femininity/feminism, or, in the case of Miley Cyrus, to get “street cred” and exotify her own sexuality by appropriating Black culture and using Black people as props to do so. See this analysis of Lily Allen’s Hard Out Here video and this analysis of Miley Cyrus by Black people who know a lot more about this than I do.
I haven’t seen anything about Katy Perry using Black dancers. I’ve just seen criticisms of her appropriating AAVE and other PoC cultures. I’m not sure why you brought her up, but maybe I just haven’t seen the videos in question.
Either way, it’s not like white artists having a diverse cast of back up dancers is a bad thing automatically. Here is an example of a white artist using back up dancers of other races without objectifying them: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8Ilh1ewceco (notice this artist tackles the same issue as Lily Allen—sexism/objectification in the media—without being misogynist and racist toward other women). But the examples of Lily Allen and Miley Cyrus ARE racist and Nicki Minaj’s video isn’t the same as theirs.

theroguefeminist:

elliedoh:

So when Miley Cyrus or Katy Perry bring black girls on stage, dance with them, acknowledge their figures- it’s offensive and appropriating. But, when Nicki Minaj makes an entire video focusing around black girl’s asses and asserts her power, reduces these women to objects and flaunts her authority it’s YAAASSSSS NICKI SERVE IT. Is that because she’s black? So it’s okay for people of the same race to dance with each other but someone who does not share the same levels of melanin enters the picture, they’re doing something wrong? …idgi 

You’re completely ignoring context. In Lily Allen’s Hard out Here video, she literally says, “I don’t shake my ass cause I have a brain” as Black women shake their asses in her video. She is literally degrading the Black women who shake their asses in the media. The song also uses references to Black rappers (i.e. the title of the song referencing the rap song “Hard out Here for a Pimp” and her lyric “bragging ‘bout my cars or talking ‘bout my chains”), suggesting that Black rappers are more sexist than white male musicians (which isn’t true, there’s lots of sexism in all music genres) and also suggest the source of sexism in the music industry is Black people (Black male rappers and twerking Black female dancers).

In contrast, Nicki Minaj is reclaiming a song (Baby Got Back) that was made by a Black male rapper who celebrated (but also objectified) Black female bodies. Throughout her song, Nicki raps like a man would, talking about her sexual conquests with men and the size of their dicks, almost as a way of doing to men what they have done to women (objectifying their dicks as Sir Mix A Lot objectified Black women’s asses and many other men objectify women’s vaginas). She also brags about her sexual prowess and stays in control and aggressive in the video (she goes as far as cutting a banana representing a dick and slapping Drake’s hand away—the video critiques the male gaze). The target of mockery and disparagement in Nicki’s video is men and the male gaze, and the video works to reclaim agency from it.

In what way is Nicki asserting power over her dancers? In her video, she twerks along side her back up dancers and dances with them and interacts with them on the same level. She is just as scantily clad as they are. Lily Allen, however, stays fully covered in her video, does not dance provocatively, and thus contrasts her own pure and respectable femininity with the Black women, using their twerking and scantily clad bodies as an example of “bad” female sexuality and femininity—of women “objectifying themselves.” This is racist because it frames Black female sexuality as lesser than white femininity and antithetical to feminism.

In summary: Nicki’s video is very much a celebration of female Black beauty and sexuality coming from a Black woman. Conversely, Lilly Allen’s is using Black women as props to frame them as a vile or bad form of sexuality or being too sexual to prop up her own feminism.

So you might say, “what about Miley Cyrus? she twerks along side her Black background dancers too!” But here’s the problem: Miley Cyrus continually appropriates Black culture and also uses Black women as props. It does matter that these artists are white because in these cases the point of including the Black women is either to, in Lily Allen’s case, offset Black sexuality/femininity as too sexual or bad in comparison with her white femininity/feminism, or, in the case of Miley Cyrus, to get “street cred” and exotify her own sexuality by appropriating Black culture and using Black people as props to do so. See this analysis of Lily Allen’s Hard Out Here video and this analysis of Miley Cyrus by Black people who know a lot more about this than I do.

I haven’t seen anything about Katy Perry using Black dancers. I’ve just seen criticisms of her appropriating AAVE and other PoC cultures. I’m not sure why you brought her up, but maybe I just haven’t seen the videos in question.

Either way, it’s not like white artists having a diverse cast of back up dancers is a bad thing automatically. Here is an example of a white artist using back up dancers of other races without objectifying them: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8Ilh1ewceco (notice this artist tackles the same issue as Lily Allen—sexism/objectification in the media—without being misogynist and racist toward other women). But the examples of Lily Allen and Miley Cyrus ARE racist and Nicki Minaj’s video isn’t the same as theirs.

4 hours ago on August 20th | J | 34,381 notes
4 hours ago on August 20th | J | 21,573 notes
Tagged as: #pugs 
hippiebabay:

solaceames:

angrywocunited:

Holy shit?????????????? (x)

This sounded too sadistic to be real, but it’s got sources (x).

It’s legit.

hippiebabay:

solaceames:

angrywocunited:

Holy shit?????????????? (x)

This sounded too sadistic to be real, but it’s got sources (x).

It’s legit.

4 hours ago on August 20th | J | 27,141 notes
Tagged as: #ferguson 

LaverneCox: @darrencriss Lovely meeting you tonight and being your backup dancer. You rock! @delta #karaoke #advantagedelta #teenagedream #saymyname

LaverneCox: @darrencriss Lovely meeting you tonight and being your backup dancer. You rock! @delta #karaoke #advantagedelta #teenagedream #saymyname

4 hours ago on August 20th | J | 1,217 notes

escapekit:

Papers for Characters

Spanish design studio Atipo has created a collection of minimalistic movie posters that are made from paper. 

Awesome. 

4 hours ago on August 20th | J | 148,941 notes

xcarolynnn:

cloudydayrealestate:

the satisfaction

One time in like 5th grade I had this teacher and she gave us all bottles of shit like this and told us to squeeze it all out and of course we were like fuck yeah and did it and then she said, “Now, try and shove it all back in the container.” Of course we all tried, and then stared at her confused as shit. When we all obviously gave up, she said, “In the moment, you were so consumed with what you were doing that you didn’t realize the mess you were making. Then, after it was so quickly and easily poured out, you realize it is impossible to put it all back in. Remember this for the rest of your lives when it comes to the words that come out of your mouth” and we were like 10 so we were like yeah ok whatever lady, but somehow to this day I think of it constantly. 

5 hours ago on August 20th | J | 518,456 notes
Tagged as: #advice 

overcome-your-dem0ns:

Relationship goals

5 hours ago on August 20th | J | 39,051 notes
Tagged as: #parks and rec 

fuckyesliampayne:

justiceandromance:

alex-is-fab:

gay-on:

Girls that love gay guys but are disgusted by lesbians.

image

Guys that love lesbians but are disgusted by gay guys.

image

Anyone who is disgusted by anyone because of their sexual preference.

image

SOCKS AND FLIP FLOPS

image

5 hours ago on August 20th | J | 468,794 notes
horchta:

// it feels so scary getting old // 
some sweet tunes about growing up and getting older
ribs - lorde// are you what you want to be - foster the people// don’t lie - vampire weekend// teenage icon - the vaccines// road to nowhere - release the sunbird// mother & father - broods// 17 - youth lagoon// congratulations - mgmt// we used to wait - arcade fire// chloroform - phoenix// cigarette daydreams - cage the elephant// the kid’s don’t stand a chance - vampire weekend 

link??

horchta:

// it feels so scary getting old // 

some sweet tunes about growing up and getting older

ribs - lorde// are you what you want to be - foster the people// don’t lie - vampire weekend// teenage icon - the vaccines// road to nowhere - release the sunbird// mother & father - broods// 17 - youth lagoon// congratulations - mgmt// we used to wait - arcade fire// chloroform - phoenix// cigarette daydreams - cage the elephant// the kid’s don’t stand a chance - vampire weekend 

link??

6 hours ago on August 20th | J | 546 notes
arzeskoenigs:

yes. That’s exactly what I meant.

arzeskoenigs:

yes. That’s exactly what I meant.

6 hours ago on August 20th | J | 384 notes

wilwheaton:

mjolnirismypenis:

imnothavinit:

Notice something in common in these photos?

It’s not what you think

I gave it away in the third pic

That’s right! None of these cops are wearing badges or name tags! I wonder why… seems like it’d be important to wear those, since it’s even illegal not to in other states…

This is actually illegal in all states. A police officer must be marked as such with name and badge at all times unless their jurisdiction states otherwise (such as an undercover officer), and even when not wearing a badge, the officer must have the badge accessible at all times and must show the badge in order to make an arrest. Name tags are not required as long as a badge is available because the badge has the officer number on it.

This has really been bothering me. The police in Ferguson are breaking the law by concealing their identities. Everyone knows this, it’s been going on for ten days, and it appears that nobody is doing anything about it.

The police are clearly and systematically violating the first amendment rights of the press, and they are getting away with it. This has been happening for days, and nobody appears to be doing anything about it.

A police officer pointed a rifle at a journalist and told him to fuck off *while he was being filmed, so he’s easily identifiable by his superiors*, and that police officer still has a job.

I know that not all cops are bad (or even most cops), but there are clearly bad cops in Ferguson, and they’re acting with complete impunity. I don’t understand why those cops aren’t being taken off the scene, and why a higher (possibly federal) authority isn’t coming in to address these things.

6 hours ago on August 20th | J | 42,033 notes

micdotcom:

Potent minimalist art sends a strong message about police and vigilante brutality in America

Journalist and artist Shirin Barghi has created a gripping, thought-provoking series of graphics that not only examines racial prejudice in today’s America, but also captures the sense of humanity that often gets lost in news coverage. Titled “Last Words,” the graphics illustrate the last recorded words by Brown and other young black people — Trayvon Martin, Oscar Grant and others — who have been killed by police in recent years.

Let us not forget their voices

6 hours ago on August 20th | J | 13,347 notes

theamazingindi:

spacephantom:

FMK lord farquaad shrek donkey

according to the movies both farquaad and shrek are terrible husbands, one is a tyranical dictator and the other one might fuck up the entirety of time if he gets bored, donkey is clearly the best husband of the three and u kno shrek a freak in the swamp so you kick farquaad’s tiny ass to the curb why is this even a question

6 hours ago on August 20th | J | 17,619 notes
Tagged as: #shrek 
youre-bey0nd-beautiful:

angrymuslimah:

"Gulabi Gang" is a gang of women in India who track down and beat abusive husbands with brooms.

this is too thug not to reblog

youre-bey0nd-beautiful:

angrymuslimah:

"Gulabi Gang" is a gang of women in India who track down and beat abusive husbands with brooms.

this is too thug not to reblog

6 hours ago on August 20th | J | 434,935 notes